Client, Editing, Proofreading

New Author Client: Dianna Gunn

I am so happy to be working with yet another amazing Canadian writer.  Dianna Gunn recently asked me to be an editor of the first book of her two-novel fantasy series called The Moonshadow Rising Duology. I’ll give  Moonshadow’s Guardian a stylistic edit, then  proofread it before it’s off to the printer.

Spoiler alert: This book is awesome!

Please consider supporting her Kickstarter for this project. At the time of publishing this post, it was at over 75% funded!

You can learn more about Dianna Gunn on her website!

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Editing, Proofreading, Tips

Seven Tips for Preparing a Happy, Shiny Manuscript

My fellow authors, I love editing your manuscripts. I truly do. I can’t even believe it’s my job! I’d ask someone to pinch me, but I bruise easily.

As much as I enjoy being an editor, what slows down my process is a manuscript that has not been properly prepared as a submittable draft. It’s important to think of me the same way you’d think of a publisher—send me your absolutely best draft ever. Trust me, I’ve been in your shoes. I’m an author, too. Self-editing is hard, I know. But this post includes some things you can do to make your manuscript shine.

Remember! A draft that’s in poor shape could cost you more money, because the editor will most likely have to do several editing passes. If you’re on a tight schedule, this could also result in missed deadlines.

Manuscript health checklist

Here are the tasks I want authors to perform before sending me their work. You can also use these tips if you’re submitting to a publisher.

  1. Format the manuscript with a commonly-used template. I have noticed publishers often prefer the William Shunn style. (You can choose Times Roman 12pt or Courrier 12pt fonts when submitting to me, but please note any publisher’s specific guidelines.)
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  2. If you download the Shunn template you should be fine, but if you’re creating a similar template, remember to set your paragraph styles with indents and not tabs. Do not add extra hard returns for paragraph spacing. Use the style formatting options to set the space between paragraphs. Also, set the line spacing to double. Scene changes are marked with a centre-aligned hashtag (#).
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  3. Understand how to punctuate dialogue. Here’s a good post about it from The Editor’s Blog.
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  4. Read your manuscript out loud, or have it read to you. You would be amazed how clunky dialogue can sound when it’s read aloud. Also, if you use apps that read your manuscript for you, and you visually follow the story while listening to it, you’ll find typos or awkwardly worded sentences that didn’t previously register. I normally convert my manuscripts to epub format and use the Read Aloud feature on Google PlayBooks, but you can also set voice features on Apple.
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  5. Have other people review your manuscript. Beta readers are essential. Good ones will tell you what works and what doesn’t.
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  6. Be honest with yourself and see if you have a repetitive habit, such as a phrase or sentence structure you write way too often, or what are known as “useless words.” This article from The Writer’s Circle discusses the most commonly overused and unnecessary words. (Confession: My manuscript was filled with “really” and “just.”)
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  7. Spell check and grammar check. Seems silly to include these, but they’re a must.

I’m sure I could think of more things, but if these seven items were checked off the list, I’d be a happy editor. A manuscript in good tick helps me concentrate on the flow of the story and pinpoint things that have been missed. No one editor can do a perfect job, but the fewer the mistakes when I receive the manuscript, the better I am at capturing those remaining.

Just another quick note before I go. Don’t think that by doing these things you won’t need an editor. I followed these tips for my book, and the three editors I had with my publisher still spotted stuff that needed correcting. It’s always good to have a fresh and professional set of eyes. We editors want to have your back and we do care that your book turns out well. Your impression as an author reflects on our work, too. It’s a mutually beneficial relationship.

So, happy self-editing. I look forward to working with you!

/cg

(Image: Hand Typing Computer Keyboard Stock Photo)

Client

New web client: Jamieson Wolf

 

Life and Lemonade
Life and Lemonade, the second book in the Lemonade series by Jamieson Wolf

We are tickled as pink as pink lemonade to be hired by Canadian writer and poet Jamieson Wolf, author of over 60 books, including his latest, Lust and Lemonade(It’s like an LGBT Sex & The City!)

Jamieson is looking to combine his blog and his current author website, and we’re more than happy to help him with that. We’ll also redesign the new website with a bright look and feel, to match the exuberant personality of its author.

So excited to be working with you, Jamieson!

Client, Crafts

New web client: Creative Ottawa Nerds (C.O.N.)

C.O.N. LogoSome of you might not know that this Madam President loves crafts. Dynamic Canvas Inc. even has a crafting division called Cait Cards. The best craft fair I’ve ever participated in was the C.O.N. Holiday Craft Fair in November 2016.

Not only are C.O.N. craft fairs well-managed with great table fees, but they also have heart—part of the proceeds go to local charitable organisations. And if that isn’t cool enough, all the artisans are proud geeks selling geeky wares (myself included). The crafts are so much fun that I might have left my table to buy a few things!

This week I was pleasantly surprised to be asked to work on their website. We’ll make it secure and include web forms, as well as give it a slight face lift. We’ll also add more content to the website, so everyone can know how awesome C.O.N. is!

I’m stoked! These are good people who I am thrilled to call my clients.

/cg

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Books, Web weaving

New web client: CAATS—Computer Assisted Analysis Techniques and Solutions

Our latest client is Dave Coderre, president of Computer Assisted Analysis Techniques and Solutions (CAATS).  CAATS offers consulting, training, articles, and books about the use of data analytics. We were so glad for the opportunity to work with Dave on revamping the CAATS website, and adding a secure e-commerce component for his books about data analytics.

Data Analysis book coverFor the CAATS website we will build an online shop using WooCommerce with WordPress. This solution integrates Dave Coderre’s blogs, books, and training information. Also with WooCommerce, we can create a bookshop where customers can browse the entire list of Dave’s books published both by CAATS and Wiley.

His latest book, Data Analysis for Internal Controls, Fraud Detection, Monitoring, and Audit, will be sold exclusively on the CAATS website as of July 2017. We wish him many sales and much success!